New Addition #2 to "The Music of Douglas Hill" in OMS

Douglas Hill – Jazz Mix for Two, Set 2

 

Jazz-Mix for 2, Set 2 is a light-hearted group of duets for horns that explore various jazz stylings not typically enjoyed by horn players. The arrangements of these original melodies are written with both parts sharing the tunes and harmonies equally.

Each duet deals with specific performance traditions.

Cha Cha Cha is a Cha Cha. It is also the first melody this composer can actually remember having created back in junior high school. The performance should be quite playful with even eighth notes, crisp staccatos, and a strong Latin dance-like feeling throughout.

Echo Horn Blues makes full use of an extended technique that distinguishes horns from all other instruments; the ability to bend the pitch with the right hand in the bell. Often called “echo horn”, the motion of covering with the hand should lower the pitch only a half-step. The effect is like the “do- wah” common to harmon mutes from trumpets and trombones. Enjoy!

Distant Dawn is a simple, lovely ballad which emphasizes the vibrant warmth of two horns singing together, sharing thoughtful, legato melodic lines and luscious sustained harmonies.

Faulty Waltz is a somewhat typical jazz waltz, notated in a compound meter to advocate for a swing feel. The cool quality and sassy use of dissonances weave through this duet. A few glissandi, aggressive articulations, and twos-over-threes, and fours-over-nines add to the fun.

New Addition #1 to "The Music Of Douglas Hill" in OMS

Douglas Hill – Jazz Mix for Two, Set 1

 

Jazz Mix for Two, Set 1 is a light-hearted group of duets for horns that explore various jazz stylings not typically enjoyed by horn players. The arrangements of these original melodies are written with both parts sharing the tunes and harmonies equally.

Each duet deals with specific performance traditions.

Ramblin’ Rag is to be performed with even eighth notes, with a tendency toward shorter, accented syncopations, and a frolicking sense of fun.

Full Circle Blues gets down and dirty with a slow swing feel. It is notated in 12/8 to add to that lazy sensation. The full circle of fourths is the form of this somewhat unique 12 bar blues design.

Begin Again is to be felt as a beguine, or lightly laced Latin dance. The eighth notes are performed evenly with accents placed gently on the syncopations, as suggested, along with some lush, lyrical lines.

Swing’s the Thing harkens back to the swing era and that loping feel of nearly a compound meter. Added here is a “walking bass line”, and some additional fall-offs, glissandos, and smears.

New Membership Coordinator

The International Horn Society is pleased to announce that Elaine Braun has been appointed by unanimous vote of the IHS Advisory Council as the society's first Membership Coordinator. Her official responsibilities will begin as soon as possible. Elaine has a long history with the IHS, serving in several capacities, as well as numerous administrative experiences with musical organizations in support of her new duties. We congratulate Elaine on this appointment and look forward to working with her in this new capacity.


Jeff Snedeker
President, IHS

Jacobus Handl Gallus– Alleluia, Cantate Domino for 12 horns

Jacobus Handl Gallus– Alleluia, Cantate Domino for 12 horns (arr. Jeffrey Snedeker) has been added to the IHS Online Music Sales.

Alleluia, Cantate Domino is from a huge collection of sacred music by Jacobus Handl Gallus, a late Renaissance Slovenian composer who spent his whole life in Moravia and Bohemia. Gallus effectively mixed the polyphonic style of the Franco-Flemish School with the antiphonal style of the Venetian School. He composed over 500 works in both sacred and secular genres, mostly music for voices up to 24 parts. Opus musicus, the collection from which this piece is taken from, is his most notable work, consisting of 374 motets that covered the liturgical needs of an entire ecclesiastical year. Alleluia, Cantate Domino is for 12 voices is organized in three four-voice SATB choirs, and shows clear influence by the Venetian cori spezzati technique. This arrangement was transcribed and edited by Jeffrey Snedeker.

Douglas Hill – "A Place for Hawks" added to OMS

Douglas Hill – A Place for Hawks for mezzo-soprano, horn, and strings

https://www.hornsociety.org/marketplace/online-library#!/Hill-Douglas-–-A-Place-for-Hawks-for-mezzo-soprano-horn-and-strings/p/75018308/category=21024120

August Derleth (1909-1971) was one of Wisconsin’s most prolific authors and poets with more than 150 published books of fiction, poetry, Wisconsin history, biography, science fiction, mystery, and short stories. His creative output more often than not derived its inspiration from his town and area of birth and life-long residence, Sauk City. The natural surroundings of these rolling hills and Wisconsin River bottoms were beautifully expressed in hundreds of his poems and much of his prose.

The four poems selected for A Place for Hawks set the poet/singer near the still and silent woods, in awe of its darkened depths during the cold of winter, wishing at once to go in and yet called by unseen walls that “only sight could breach.” This uncertain solitude is suddenly disturbed by a frightening and fantastic encounter with “the great bird” as he flies near and shares a brief moment of eye contact before reentering the “darkness of the winter wood.” The third poem finds the poet/singer virtually soaring with a “hawk on the wind.” Having moved beyond the darkness and uncertainty of primal nature, the poet/singer finds kinship and ecstasy simply watching as the hawk floats, circles, vaults, and dives. The final poem sings warmly and optimistically of the coming of spring with its blossoms, birdsongs, and “birch with yellow catkins” shaking in the air. The poet/singer looks forward to a journey to the hills “far from village streets” where the “hawk flies high” and where the “earth of grass and tree” will surely provide “their strength again.”

Taken as a literal set of experiences or as a symbolic confrontation with one’s own nature, these poems, and the music which enhances their power and romantic simplicity, reach outward to touch a certain spirit which connects us all to the earth, grass, trees, and the joyful soaring of the hawk.

The composer wishes to thank “the Graduate School of the University of Wisconsin-Madison for its grant support which made the composition and preparation of this work possible.