Abbreviations and Slang

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26 feb 2008 12:45 #54 by Martin Künkler
Abbreviations and Slang was created by Martin Künkler
Hello to the (American) Hornworld.

For me as a non-american (and I think for a lot of other Foreigners, too), sometimes its a Problem, to read "The Horn Call"-Magazine or to understand, what the Author means. Abbreviations like "BSO" or Others or Slang-words like "chops" are not shown in any Kind of Dictionary. For an American, who learned German in School, it will be not possible to understand the "Harald Schmidt-Show" and for a Foreigner, who has learnd English (British English!) in School, its not possible to understand "Jay Leno". Wont it be possible, to give up the Abbreviations and the "inside"-Slang?:(

Regards, Martin

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22 apr 2008 13:30 #91 by Michael Burke
Replied by Michael Burke on topic Abbreviations and Slang
BSO - Boston Symphony Orchestra

If you need help to define stuff please fell free to leave something in the forum... I am sure some of us Americans can help you


09555
Michael Burke
Westfield State College Horn Student
U.S. Marine Musician

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23 apr 2008 10:47 #92 by Martin Künkler
Replied by Martin Künkler on topic Abbreviations and Slang
Thanks for Your support!

And here are some words, I dont understand:

buzzing: It means to phone (call) someone, or it means (in german) "summen". Thats singing with a closed mouth. So "buzzing" on the horn means to play "cantabile" (a singing tone)?

chop(s): Embouchure (in german "Ansatz")??????

Thanks a lot for Your replys.

Martin

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03 okt 2008 12:43 #180 by Molly White
Replied by Molly White on topic Abbreviations and Slang
Martin - did you ever get an answer? Buzzing is to play the mouthpiece alone, without the horn. See Robert Ward's post on "mouthpiece buzzing". There is also just buzzing your embouchure with no mouthpiece and no horn at all. Both can be useful exercises in small amounts. But you'll want a towel or napkin.

"Chops" means your lips, and I think all the muscles around your mouth, cheeks and chin. Embouchure I think refers to specifically the shape of your lips when in playing position, such as the difference between Ansetzen and Einsetzen (did I spell that right?) A person could have very strong, healthy chops but some wierd embouchure problems. Or a perfect embouchure but weak or worn out (or injured) chops.

Hope both your chops and your embouchure are in great shape!

- Molly

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04 okt 2008 07:50 #181 by Martin Künkler
Replied by Martin Künkler on topic Abbreviations and Slang
Dear Molly,

thanks for Your post!
I do a lot of "buzzing" with the kids I teach. In german it means "Mundstückübung" = mouthpieceexercises.
"Chops" is not so easy to translate, because for all arround this (embouchure, etc.) we only use one word: Ansatz = "set-on"

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15 apr 2009 17:45 #272 by Scott Hawkinson
Replied by Scott Hawkinson on topic Abbreviations and Slang
Hi, Martin -
But what about us? We English-speakers would love to know what the Harald Schmidt-Show is! I'm going to google it now (google makes no sense in any language).

-Viel Dank!

PS: Buzzing has been delightfully defined in horn-playing terms; but I'll add that it is the funny sound like a bee or fly makes. I admire you for knowing English so well. My German, zum Beispiel, is nicht sehr gut.

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